Crossroads

Many of you may have assumed that my lack of posts lately was related to my decision to bring the blog to a close in a couple months. Not exactly.

In fact, the real reason I haven’t been posting is because I lost my job.

Here’s what happened. We’ve had a new managing director running the L.A. office for a while now and he’s been a real hard ass. I was up for a promotion and that means a review and I guess Justin didn’t think I was ready for the big leagues. He didn’t exactly fire me, he just sort of implied that I was never going to rise in the company and that I should “pursue other opportunities.” So I guess technically I quit but either way, I am now unemployed.

I shouldn’t complain because I know I’m doing much better financially than most people out there. And not to make me seem like an even bigger dick but I got a severance package that will cover my expenses for the rest of the year.

But the big question is, what the hell am I supposed to do now? Find another job in banking? I always complained that this wasn’t what I wanted to do for the rest of my life but now that the job is gone, the idea of trying something else seems pretty scary. Michelle thinks I should try writing a book about the Project but I don’t want to be one of those cliches. Or maybe I really would love to write about it but I’m afraid I’ll suck at it and I’ll be one of those losers in the Starbucks that I make fun of.

It’s also just a really bad time to start a new career. The wedding is coming up in two months and we’ve got a ton of things to do. Well, actually, it’s really good timing to be unemployed so I can focus on the wedding, it’s just not a good time to find another job.

So that’s where I am, in case you were wondering. Once again at the crossroads.

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12 Responses to Crossroads

  1. Alex C says:

    Wow! I feel for you man, thanks for sharing. I often find situations like this are a blessing in disguise–I mentioned a couple months ago I was on furlough, and now here I am in a shiny new job I love even more than my last one.

    Especially if you have the unique luxury of not being financially strapped right now, I would take this time to relax and slow things down a bit. Definitely focus on the wedding, then after that, who knows? Keep talking to strangers, and maybe a new career opportunity will simply present itself… you never know.

  2. Ken says:

    If, hypothetically, this entire blog was a fiction – when, hypothetically, would you reveal this?

  3. Matt says:

    I’ve commented once before on your blog, a page that has meant a lot to me. I’m just a 33 year old single guy, normal in most respects, but constantly feel like you did…disconnected and alone.

    I was a radio producer/writer and the last five years have lost my job so many times…the ultimate disconnect besides death or a really bad Elevator Girl type break-up. I guess I just want to say…I’m sorry for you and, because of what your blog has meant to me, I wish you all the best.

    Ya know…I won’t say, “one door closed, another opens” or any of that kind of bullshit because it’s all bullshit anyway.

    But you have the Elevator Girl, man. I’d say you’re very lucky.

    Please write. Use your new connections. I don’t know a better one for your story then Lost’s Damon Lindelof, who said he was fascinated by you.

  4. S. Dillinger says:

    Is it a douche move to get paid and support your “soon to be” family? Take all of this, turn it into a book, go back and add elements and forgotten connections or details to make it interesting for those who already know your story. Add some elements like having Michelle’s point of view on things like the “….I LOVE YOU” drunk episode and such. This could easily be a great book.

    You’re 30 something. Worrying about being a sell out is like being 17 again. Don’t concern yourself what people think, just go and try to get what you deserve and make the choices that lead to a stable and strong future for you and the wife. A chance to take this thing more public, help people, and potentially become some author who inspired a few thousand into a better life path is a great thing.

    Then mention me in the credits.

  5. Lynn says:

    You should absolutely compile this blog into a book. I got hooked on the blog through a co-worker a few months ago and we read the majority of it through the course of two days. It reads very well (and a bit melodramatic) and being in the entertainment industry, we often talked about how it could easily get optioned for TV or film. You worked hard on this so there is no shame in possibly making some money off of it. It could end up being a profitable nest egg for your future family. Best of Luck and thank you for writing this blog.

  6. Jennifer says:

    How do you get a severance package when you quit? I’ve been trying to score something like that for years. Seriously, how?

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