Chloegeddon

So as you all know now, Carmageddon was the Y2K of 2011. But that didn’t stop us from moving forward with Chloegeddon.

Chloe came over around 2:00 on Friday. Things started off a bit shakey when I saw how much shit she brought. I mean, she’s slept over before, so I thought three nights would equal roughly three times as much shit. But she literally brought moving boxes. I was so freaked out I blurted out, “It’s just the weekend, it’s not permanent.”

In retrospect, this was the wrong thing to say, I admit. I might as well have said, “Don’t get your hopes up, kid.” Anyway, she got over it, and after an afternoon at the dog park, we walked down to San Vicente to have dinner.

Friday night was actually pretty fun. We did watch a movie (The Lincoln Lawyer–not bad but not exactly romantic or particularly memorable). And we did actually make s’mores on the stove.

The trouble happened on Saturday when we realized Carmageddon was a bust and that the freeways were empty. Chloe had been… how can I put this without sounding like a douche?… touching my stuff. Not to be confused with touching my junk, Chloe was just moving a lot of shit around. Making suggestions on how to arrange things differently. Opening drawers I didn’t want her to open. It seems super small now, but at the time it was really bugging me.

We played Monopoly and I got the yellow properties. She landed on Marvin Gardens and I had a hotel there. She didn’t have enough cash so she said, “Oh, well, you win.”

I said, “No, you have to mortgage your properties.”

She said, “What’s the point? You win.”

I said, “That’s not how you play. You have to mortgage your properties and then you can buy them back later if you get enough money.”

We argued about this for a while. Then she said I was acting like a typical investment banker and that “there’s more important things in the world than money.”

I had no idea she had this deep-seated resentment of what I do for a living. She’s never complained before when my banking job bought her dinner.

I said, “If you don’t like the way the game is played, then why don’t you just quit.”

I don’t know if she thought that had some deep subtext, but I really just meant Monopoly. But she started packing up her stuff.

I said I was sorry. I said to stay. I said the freeway is still closed.

She said there’s no cars on any roads and she’d make it home just fine.

Then she left.

Can someone please tell me what just happened here? And why did I think it was a good idea inviting her to move in for the weekend?

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6 Responses to Chloegeddon

  1. marcel says:

    Man, my heart bleeds for you.
    1) Never play competitive board games with people. Unless they are literally stuck with you it’s a recipe for conflict.
    2) Many people have issues with people touching their stuff, instead of bottling it up, you should have just told her. This way when you do have an outburst (since she’ll probably do it anyway), it is not entirely your fault. Much like you first comment, her outburst about bankers probably wasn’t well thought out. She probably just regurgitated the general sentiment perpetuated throughout society due to the perceived cause of current economic climate.
    3) You have to remember why you are doing things. Surely the weekend was intended to be a bonding moment for you two? Then commenting on the transience of the situation was probably not the best idea. This also applies to monopoly; you guys started with the intention of having fun. Clearly, when she conceded she no longer wanted to play she wasn’t having fun. Attempting to make her play was both counterproductive and immature since it’s not likely you could force her to enjoy monopoly.
    In summary, I think inviting her over was probably a good idea; you should have just planned it with more thought and consideration. I hope you apologise soon, even if you don’t mean it, and explain that you were only referring to monopoly. Good luck.
    P.S. never play Monopoly again.

  2. Sheikiah says:

    Oh, what a sad event. I think that she was overreacting (maybe because the money is like a landmine topic to her?), although you were nitpicking over little things (that’s all I can say from the data I have).
    For me, the thing is that you lost insight with the game. The game is an excuse for creating bonds, and having fun with her. You should have stopped when the thing started to annoy her. You cannot play Monopoly by yourself, after all.
    Maybe my solutions sound all like “being a good-natured doormat”, but the fact is that being with someone for a long lapse of time is as hard as getting to know the girl that visits that café every evening.

  3. NoAmbition says:

    I agree with what Marcel and Sheikiah said, but I’m taking a more distant perspective on it …

    It sucks that it went down that way (although it couldn’t have been entirely unexpected), but you were both being yourselves (F her for giving up, by the way; most people don’t know about the mortgaging and for her to just give up and then claim you were being a moneyfreak is silly; something must’ve been eating her) and if there was conflict in that then it means you’ll have to learn to work it out if you’re to be together … if that doesn’t/can’t happen then you weren’t meant to be together. Easy for me to say while you’re the one with the heartache, but that’s the deal.

    So, here’s your action plan (should you choose to accept it, Mr. Phelps):
    — spend some time (more than a couple of hours) thinking about if you want to get back together with her
    — if no, call and apologize and tell her thanks for helping get you the dog
    — if yes, call and apologize and explain your side of the meltdown calmly

    Good luck, dude.

  4. annoyed reader says:

    You just don’t get it, do you? Guess your money and job and pride are more valuable to you than being loved or liked. I had the benefit of a shrink telling me one time, “Do you want to be right (and alone), or loved?”

    Can’t play Monopoly by yourself, can you? You know Ted Turner was one of the wealthiest men at one time, and also one of the most miserable. Do you see the lesson yet?

  5. annoyed reader says:

    “I had no idea she had this deep-seated resentment of what I do for a living. She’s never complained before when my banking job bought her dinner.”

    You just don’t get it, do you? Guess your money and job and pride are more valuable to you than being loved or liked. I had the benefit of a shrink telling me one time, “Do you want to be right (and alone), or loved?”

    Can’t play Monopoly by yourself, can you? You know Ted Turner was one of the wealthiest men at one time, and also one of the most miserable. Do you see the lesson yet?

  6. PinkLaser says:

    Is it cause she said ‘You win.’ but you tried to force her to keep playing only to hit her with a ‘why don’t you just give up?’?

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